This dance is set for a single couple. The entire dance is done in piva time (2/4).

Measures Steps
Part A – Procession together
8 8 pive forward.
Part B – Chasing figure
4 The man leaves with two sempii, a piva, and three sempii, bringing his feet together on the last beat.
4 The woman catches up with the same steps.
4 The man leaves with 3 pive and a sempio, bringing his feet together on the last beat.
4 The woman catches up with the same steps.
Part C – Leaving and Returning
4 The man leaves with two sempii, a piva, and three sempii (the same steps as the first half of the chasing figure), ending with a mezavolta to face his partner.
1 Both do a riverenza.
4 The man returns with 3 pive and a sempio (the same steps as the second half of the chasing figure), ending with a mezavolta to face forward again.
The dance repeats, with the woman doing each figure first.

Step Descriptions

Piva (pl. pive)

The piva is a quick, syncopated double. The second step is shorter than the other two, coming up next to or just ahead of the lead foot. This results in a skipping (or step-ball-change) sort of step. Staying on the balls of your feet will help keep your steps light and fast. Each piva takes one measure of music.

Sempio (pl. sempii)

This is a single step, as seen in bransles, almans, and elsewhere. In this dance, each sempio takes one beat (half a measure) of music.

Mezavolta

This is a turn halfway around. In this dance it happens in one beat (half a measure) of music.

Riverenza

This is a bow or curtsy, done by drawing the left foot back and bending the knees to lower the body, keeping the torso vertical. The riverenza in this dance is quite short.

Teaching Notes

Lorenzo Petrucci:
There are two variations commonly seen when doing this dance. The first figure may be either 8 or 12 pive (both are found in the original manuscripts), and the final leaving and returning figure may be done by one or both partners. Which version you do depends on the recording you use (or the whims of your musicians).